Probably the question I get asked more than any other is how on earth I ended up rescuing horses and starting a mustang sanctuary in Oregon.  After all I am from a small town called Cobham in Surrey in ENGLAND!!!!!  so......I have always had a love of horses and got my first when I was a little girl but even before that there are photographs of me carrying toy horses everywhere I went as well as the imaginary one I galloped around the woods behind my house!  I grew up watching westerns like The Virginian, Bonanza and Little House on the Prairie and every cowboy movie I could see where I cried when any horse or indian got shot and killed.   But my favorite show of all and one that got me through some very difficult times as a child was Champion the wonder horse which was a series about a band of mustangs.  I used to fall asleep at night dreaming of that horse and his adventures.  It saved my life that I could disappear into the fantasy world of the wild west and I decided I was going to grow up and marry Trampas from The Virginian or Elvis and ride his palomino Rising Sun around Graceland.  But it wasn't to be but during various times of my adult life I did have horses, ride horses, be around horses and finally when I moved to LA I used to hike in Beechwood canyon and see people riding by and found Sunset Ranch where I bought and boarded my first horse Elvis, a paint quarter horse.  Well that ranch had a lot of mustangs that they used as string horses to carry tourists up and down the hill to the Hollywood sign.  I bought my second horse from that string and that was Buddy.  From him and through him I learned about mustangs and their plight and what the US government and the BLM were doing to our wild horses and it made me sad and then very angry.  I just had to do something.  I adopted a few more riding mustangs when I moved to a ranch in Calabasas and then a couple more when I moved to a larger ranch in Malibu and I started donating to help mustangs out of kill pens or at auctions to stop them shipping.  I realized the only way I could make a bigger difference was to have more land to save more horses and also be able to raise awareness and let more people know what was happening.  So Skydog was born.  I read an old Blackfoot legend about how the native american indians when they first saw horses called them Skydogs - sent from the old man in the sky to help them.  So that is where the name came from.  And we haven't stopped from there.  With the help of my incredible husband he bought the ranch in Oregon that we lease from him for the horses.  It is a wonderful life so far away from where I was a couple of years ago.  I am never happier than with the wind in my face, snow boots on, dirt under my nails and smelling of horse poop.   Every thing I have given up has been worth it to spend my days living with wild horses in the wilds of Oregon in the shadow of Sheep Rock.  It is a sacred place and I feel real there and my life has purpose.  I wanted to start writing a blog - mainly because so many of you asked me to or suggested I do and also for myself to keep track of this incredible journey we are all on.  And let you all know who we are here at Skydog and get a little behind the scenes look at our sanctuary and what we are doing here and a bit more about the horses we call our family.  I hope you enjoy it.  Clare Staples, founder of Skydog Sanctuary

The front gate of Skydog Sanctuary - this is where we ask people to leave their troubles at the gate.  We have a little wooden box where you can write down on paper anything that you are worrying about and put it in the box and leave it behind when you enter xxx

The front gate of Skydog Sanctuary - this is where we ask people to leave their troubles at the gate.  We have a little wooden box where you can write down on paper anything that you are worrying about and put it in the box and leave it behind when you enter xxx